In this pānui
 
• Kāhui Pou – Rangitāne’s
Inaugural Kura Reo
• Database Administrator – Rosie Haeata
• 5k sponsorship grants
• Huhuti Raukura Wānanga
• Weaving whānau together –
Justina Webster

• Te Wiki o te Reo Māori – 2019
• Pō Patapatai ki Whakaoriori Marae
• Te Reo ki Tamaki Nui a Rua
• Whakanuia – Jade Moses
 
 
Upcoming events for your Calendar
 
Saturday 28 September, 10am @ Carterton Events Centre
Māori Cancer Hui
28 September @ Rakautatahi Marae
Aorangi AGM
4 – 6 October @ Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Wairarapa
Kāhui Pou (Kura Reo)
18 October @ Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Wairarapa
TKKMoW Gala
19 October @ Whakaoriori Marae
Poua Reo Wānanga 2
24 October @ TKKMoW
Dress Rehearsal Ngā Puāwai o Te Kura
 
 
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Kāhui Pou – Rangitāne’s
Inaugural Kura Reo
 
 

On the last day of Te Tapuwaetahi o Rangitāne in March, during the ‘Future Aspirations’ workshop whānau discussed the idea of having the first ever Kura Reo for Rangitāne.

Two months later, on Saturday 11th May, Tū Mai Rā hosted representatives from Wairau, Manawatū, Tamaki Nui A Rua, and Wairarapa at Pūkaha to further discuss the logistics and get the ball rolling for the inaugural Kura Reo.

An application for funding was lodged with Te Mātāwai and we successfully procured funding to have the first Kura Reo in Wairarapa 4th-6th October. It was given the name “Kāhui Pou” by our two cultural advisors Matua Manahi and Mike, paying homage to the well-known oriori “Uiui noa au”.

The wānanga will include workshops on Rangitāne history, language for the home, composition, and te reo o te rangatahi. Registrations are now closed, and we really look forward to the opportunity for whakawhanaungatanga and learning.

 
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The wānanga will include workshops on Rangitāne history, language for the home, composition, and te reo o te rangatahi.
 
 
 
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Database Administrator

Tū Mai Rā would like to extend a warm welcome to Rosie Haeata, the successful applicant for our Database Administrator role. She will start on the 30th September, and we are excited to have her join our growing team.

Her role will predominantly be updating our database and tracking down whānau with invalid contact details or incomplete registrations. It is important our database is fit for purpose so whānau can stay up to date with the mahi we are doing and the opportunities that we have as they become available.

This year we have had four hui ā-iwi, merchandise give-aways, wānanga/workshops, employment opportunities, and educational opportunities like Poua Reo and Kāhui Pou. If your details aren’t up to date then you may have missed some of our pānui. Registered members also have the opportunity to hunt on our whenua blocks we received as part of our settlement and apply for our $5k sponsorship grants to support a kaupapa that aligns with one of our objectives. More information can be found online at https://tumaira.iwi.nz/sponsorship-and-funding/

 
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Rosie will work closely with the rest of our team to update everyone’s details and if you would like to check your details are correct and up to date please call us or email registrations@tumaira.iwi.nz
 
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Huhuti Raukura Wānanga
 
 
Earlier this year we held a number of hui ā-iwi throughout the rohe to meet and engage with our iwi members. We wanted to share our aspirations for the future and to know what issues are important to our whānau. One of the key priorities that came from whānau at the hui was to have more opportunities to meet as Rangitāne and spend time together.
 
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Thanks to Sharn Webster for supplying the photos.
 
 

Whānau came from as far as South Wairarapa and the Manawatū to take part in the first of two planned whakawhanaungatanga wānanga. The first wānanga was held at Taratahi (Holdsworth Lodge) on the 27th of August in Wairarapa. The day began with karakia, a session by Matua Mike on local history, whakawhanaungatanga and waiata.

The wānanga took place at DoC’s Holdsworth Lodge which sits adjacent to the small land block that was returned to Rangitāne through our settlement. As part of our relationship with DOC, we have use of the lodge up to ten times a year. It was a wonderful day enjoyed by all. Some of the whānau were old hands and others had never done anything like it before. The attendees said they had thoroughly enjoyed learning at the wānanga.

 
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As part of our settlement, Pūkaha was returned to Rangitāne. While we have always been kaitiaki, the return formalised our role as mana whenua. Due mainly to the huge costs, it will be gifted to the nation and DoC will continue to operate Pūkaha, but we will have an increased role in this important taonga.
 
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The ceremonial side of these exchanges will happen in 2020-21 and will be marked with two korowai. One that will hang at Pūkaha to serve as a reminder, and a second one to be used by Rangitāne for formal events and ceremonial kaupapa.

The feathers that were plucked on the day will be used to make the korowai. Most of the birds came from Pūkaha and some had been in the freezer at DoC. They included kiwi, toroa, kererū, and kākā as well. A second wānanga will be held later this year. Date tbc. A big thank you to one of the whānau participants, Justina Webster, who attended the wānanga with two of her children and submitted the reflection piece below – ka nui te mihi!

 
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Weaving whānau together –
Justina Webster
 
 

On a cold wet winter’s morning we packed our car up to head home to Wairarapa, to Taratahi. Excitement in the air as our waka climbed the Saddle Road, Te Apiti. Beams of sunshine peeked through the clouds and reflected off the Ruahine and Tararua ranges as we made our way home. You could feel the energy growing as we all knew the day would be bursting with opportunity and adventure.

The venue for our wānanga was Taratahi, not Taratahi Agricultural Farm but Mount Holdsworth. How did I not know that was Taratahi. There was laughter and a heap of humility as we travelled along the narrow road to the gates of Mt Holdsworth. It’s been nearly 30 years since I have been here. As we pull onto the gravel road there is slight sadness but also loads of happy memories. This place reminds me of camping trips with my Aunty Liz.

 
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We check in with each other before we exit the car as we know we are lucky to be attending this wānanga huhuti manu. Our desire to be active in iwi activities and the restoration and reclamation of traditional knowledge draws us back to our tūrangawaewae. Whanaungatanga occurs as soon as we close the car doors. Two of my children are with me, an honour to do this mahi with my tamariki. Introducing themselves to whānau strengthens their ties. We are basking in the environment, not even the cold or rain can dampen our spirits. Manu flit around as they check us out. When everyone is here, we take a short stroll up to the lodge. There is a wairua here like no other. Past memories, present opportunities and future strategies all rolled into one. The whare is strangely warm inside. It looks nothing like the hut that was there all those years ago. The fire is lit, and we settle in for our adventure.
 
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Papa Mike leads us in delving deeper in our tikanga, whānau and whakapapa connections. His kōrero links us to this whenua, to Taratahi; to our tupuna: to Kupe, Haunui-a-nanaia, Tara and Taraiti. Stories of survival and ingenuity at Taratahi and Remutaka. It’s no wonder the wairua here is vibrant. The kōrero of Tatau Pounamu and our relationship with Te Ati Awa. Why did we not learn this stuff at school? He kōrero tūī – time to learn some waiata as well. So much learning in such a short time, stories that will be shared with other whānau members, that is our commitment and responsibility.
 
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Wow, all of this before we even start our huhuti manu. Some of the whānau have attended previous wānanga manu before so they know the process. We organise our stations, roles and equipment. Sorting manu, plucking, washing and drying feathers. Such an honour to give another life to these manu. Aria finds a Kākā to work on first, she is drawn to the red feathers that shine through. Sharn starts on a Kiwi. We are all humbled to be be able to pat the kiwi, such a rare opportunity. We take pride in knowing that these manu have lived in our background and gifted back to Iwi. The three of us work on kiwi. Kereru also await us. Some of the manu have names, we refer to those respectfully as unclothe them of their feathers. Wow, as a whānau we have been able to work on Kākā, Kiwi and Kereru. Sharn also debones a Toroa to make koauau and hopefully uhi that will adore the skin.
 
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As we reflect on the mahi we have been involved in today I am grateful for a number of things:

  • to have the opportunity to do this mahi alongside my tamariki, they don’t have to wait until they are in their 40s to do it.
  • To learn more about our Rangitānetanga. To learn our own stories about Taratahi and Remutaka.
  • To continue the work of our tupuna in preserving and continuing another life for these manu, knowing their feathers will adorn whānau in kākahu, kete, poi, heru, taa moko.
  • Being able to build our identity as Rangitāne
  • Whānaungatanga
  • To be able to share our knowledge with the whānau in future wānanga.
 
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Te Wiki o te Reo Māori – 2019
 
 

rangitane poua reo

Te reo Māori is a taonga, guaranteed under the Te Tiriti o Waitangi. But the Māori Language Act 2016 also makes clear it is for every New Zealander and a valued part of our national identity.
 

Māori Language Week is a government-sponsored initiative intended to encourage New Zealanders to promote the use of te reo, Aotearoa’s first official language. Māori Language week has been celebrated each year from 1975 and this year’s theme was ‘Kia kaha te reo Māori’ – ‘Let’s make the Māori language strong’. It is an opportunity for concentrated celebration, promotion and encouragement of te reo.

It’s a part of the national promotion of te reo Māori undertaken by Crown agencies and coordinated by the Māori Language Commission as part of the Crown’s Māori language strategy, the Maihi Karauna. This strategy supports the revitalisation strategy of Māori and iwi, led by Te Mātāwai.

It is also a great opportunity for organisations and groups to promote revitalisation with some cafés even giving discounts for people who order their coffee in te reo. Many activities take place throughout the nation, here are a few below that were hosted in our rohe to celebrate this year.

 
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Pō Patapatai ki Whakaoriori Marae
 
 

rangitane poua reo

On Wednesday evening, Matua Mike hosted a quiz night in te reo Māori at Whakaoriori Marae with some new Rangitāne merchandise, Māori language books, and other goodies as prizes.

There was a fabulous turnout of young and old with ages ranging from 14 to 80 and whānau even travelled from as far as Lake Ōnoke to participate in the evening’s activities.

 
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It was a close match with the teachers from Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Wairarapa taking out first place and the Ōnoke Avengers coming in at a close second.
The rest of the teams were miles behind the top two but it was a night full of laughter, fun facts, and most importantly ‘kōrero Māori’.
 
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Ka nui te mihi ki ngā kaiwhakaako me te whānau o Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Wairarapa i whakaihu waka! Ka mihi hoki ki a Matua Mike me ngā ringawera.
 
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Te Reo ki Tamaki Nui a Rua
 
 
Te Wiki o te Reo Māori was celebrated in Tamaki nui a Rua with a week full of events for the whole community to be in attendance at.
 
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Monday started off with an open combined karakia led by Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Tamaki nui a Rua ākonga at Mākirikiri Marae. This was a beautiful start to the week as it showed those who attended the teachings of Karakia learnt at the Kura and an insight to their Karakia they hold every Monday and Friday morning so this was great to be a part of something very special.
 

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Tuesday was a great day filled with activities at the Hub provided by some of the Kaimahi of Rangitāne o Tamaki nui a Rua and also the help of other Whānau. Majority of the schools and Kohanga came in attendance, there were colouring competitions, a big chess game, scrabble in Te Reo Māori, Moko Kauae stencils, mau rākau, toys provided by the local Toy Library for the pepi and a section where the tamariki were able to write down their whāinga. Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Tamaki nui a Rua along with St Josephs School performed special items to those in attendance as well. This day was much enjoyed by all those that attended.
 

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Wednesday there was Kawhē and Kōrero held at the Bakehouse, this is where Whānau were challenged to order their Kawhē in Te Reo Māori and those who successfully did this received a complimentary slice in return. Spot prizes were also given out as well.

Thursday and Friday was the annual Tamaki nui a Rua Kapahaka festival which is hosted by Tamai and Claudia Nicholson. This is a great opportunity for Kohanga, Early Childcare Providers, Primary and Secondary Schools and also community groups to showcase their kapahaka skills and for Whānau to come and witness this.

 

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Thursday was for the non-competitive Schools, Kohanga and Early Childcare Providers. Friday was for the competitive Schools, Community groups and also had the pleasure of having performances from Foxton Beach School and Hukarere. Tararua College, Te Wharetiti, Dannevirke South School and Huia Range were all successful in receiving awards. In the end all those that performed were winners. It was an amazing event that continues to grow every year. Te Wiki o te Reo Māori was celebrated in Tamaki nui a Rua with a week full of events for the whole community to be in attendance at.
 
A special mention needs to go out to Kelly Paewai a kaimahi of Rangitāne o Tamaki nui a Rua who was the main organiser for the Monday to Wednesday events. Every year the activities get more and more interest and that is the aim to have the whānau out and about learning Te Reo Māori in a way that makes it easier for them to learn and use in a day to day environment.
 
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Whakanuia – Jade Moses
 
 
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On the 3rd of September Jade Moses who is a kaimahi of Rangitāne o Tamaki nui a Rua received an ‘Innovative Provider’ award on behalf of the Festival of Adult Learning awards.

Jade has been recognised for providing our whānau in the Tamaki nui a Rua area with an at home Te Reo Māori course, not only has he been working in the homes with Whānau he has also been teaching kaimahi at various Early childhood centres.

He has been well received within the community and it just goes to show with this award, which is very well deserved.

If you are wanting to find out more about the Kāinga Kōrero course and are in the Tamaki nui a Rua you can contact him on 06-374 68 60 8.30am – 4.30pm Monday – Friday.

 
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