In this pānui

  • Funding for Rangitāne Kaupapa
  • COVID-19
  • Te Tapuwaetahi o Rangitāne Postponement
  • Revitalising historical narratives through Kapa Haka
  • Profile: Jo Heperi
  • Whānau Ora Day
  • Ruahine

Funding for Rangitāne Kaupapa

Rangitāne Tū Mai Rā Trust has 5K up for grabs! If you have a kaupapa that aligns with one of the following categories, please visit our website for an application form. Link at bottom. Close date 31 July with the decision notified in August.

  • Rūnanga;
  • Hapū;
  • Marae;
  • Community;
  • Economic Development;
  • Health and Wellbeing;
  • Conservation and the Environment;
  • Arts, Culture and Heritage;
  • Education; or
  • Technology

SPONSORSHIP & FUNDING

COVID-19

COVID-19 is a new illness that can affect your lungs and airways caused by a virus called coronavirus. The symptoms of COVID-19 are:

  • a cough
  • a high temperature (at least 38°C)
  • shortness of breath.

Rangitāne o Wairarapa Leaders support the stance taken by other Iwi and recommend that all forms of contact (hongi, harirū) during cultural ceremonies (pōhiri and whakatau) be suspended to help prevent the spread of the virus and to keep our most vulnerable safe and well.
People with symptoms of COVID-19 are asked to call Healthline for advice and direction, and to call ahead before arriving at their GP or hospital for assessment. Healthline’s dedicated COVID-19 number, 0800 358 5453, is free and available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

How is it spread?

COVID-19, like the flu, can be spread from person to person. When a person who has COVID-19 coughs, sneezes or talks, they may spread droplets containing the virus a short distance, which quickly settle on surrounding surfaces. You may get infected by the virus if you touch those surfaces or objects and then touch your mouth, nose or eyes.
That’s why it’s really important to use good hygiene, regularly wash and thoroughly dry your hands, and use good cough etiquette.

What can I do to stop COVID-19 spreading?

  • Cough or sneeze into your elbow or by covering your mouth and nose with tissues.
  • Put used tissues in the bin or a bag immediately.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water often (for at least 20 seconds).
  • Try to avoid close contact with people who are unwell.
  • Don’t touch your eyes, nose or mouth if your hands are not clean.
  • Avoid personal contact, such as kissing, sharing cups or food with sick people.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces and objects, such as doorknobs.

Self-isolation is one of the most effective ways we have of keeping individuals, families and our communities safe and healthy and stopping the spread. Every situation is different, but at its most basic point it means staying at home if you’re sick, or if you may have been in contact with the virus. It means taking simple, common-sense steps to avoid close contact with other people as much as possible. Information sourced from the Ministry of Heath website https://www.health.govt.nz/

Te Tapuwaetahi o Rangitāne Postponement

Te Tapuwaetahi o Rangitāne Festival 2020 in Wairau has been postponed due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak. Please see pānui below for more information from the hosts.

Revitalising historical narratives through Kapa Haka

Excitement filled the air in late February at The Regent Theatre as the last group of the day, Te Ringa Kaha, took to the stage.  It was at the Tangata Rau Senior Kapa Haka Festival in Manawatū where the first timers made their debut to an ecstatic crowd.

They group have been practicing since May with the majority of their rōpū new to the competitive stage. Compositions took listeners on a journey of the Tamaki district and its distinctive history.

Te Ringa Kaha’s Wharemako Paewai says, “Our entrance item is about the landmarks of Turake. It’s so the world and our people know where the boundaries were marked during land exploration.”

The day boasted fantastic displays from all nine Rangitāne rōpū as they vied for a spot at Te Matatini 2021 in Tamaki-Makaurau. The three groups representing Rangitāne at Te Matatini 2021 are Te Tū Mataora, Te Tini o Rehua, and Te Ringa Kaha. Full results below.

Whakaeke: 3 Te Ringa Kaha 2 Te Tū Mataora 1 Te Tini o Rehua
Mōteatea: 2nd equal Te Tini o Rehua & Te Ringa Kaha 1 Te Tū Mataora
Waiata-ā-ringa: 3 Te Ringa Kaha 2 Te Tini o Rehua 1 Te Tū Mataora
Poi: 3 Te Ringa Kaha 1st equal Te Tū Mataora & Te Tini o Rehua
Haka: 3 Te Ringa Kaha 1st equal Te Tū Mataora & Te Tini o Rehua
Wātea: 3 Te Ringa Kaha 2 Te Tini o Rehua 1 Te Tū Mataora
Te Mita o te Reo: 3 Te Ringa Kaha & Pamutana 2 Te Tini o Rehua 1 Te Tū Mataora

Profile: Jo Heperi

Jo Heperi

Jo Heperi who is of Ngāti Hāmua descent is the current RMA officer for Rangitāne o Tamaki Nui a Rua. She has recently also taken on the kaimahi role in representation of Rangitāne o Tamaki nui a Rua for the Te Ahu a Tūranga roading project.

Jo has a had a great educational journey which is worth mentioning. For half of her life Jo worked in the shearing sheds which she loved and because it was seasonal she decided to purchase a computer to study and broaden her educational knowledge.

She came across an advertisement in the local newspaper and discovered that there was an EIT regional Learning Centre in Waipukurau offering a Level 2 computer program which worked out great as she lives just down the road in Takapau. She loved the course and had a feeling it would open up more educational opportunities for herself and she was right as she went on to do a level 3 qualification and a diploma in Business.

In 2007 she was offered a job at that learning centre to become a learning facilitator and a few months later as an assistant for students with disabilities. She went on to get a diploma in therapeutic massage at the Lotus Holistic Centre in Hastings which saw her open her own massage business and also teach an introductory massage course at EIT.

She joined the Taiwhenua o Tamatea in a project monitoring the water of the rivers in the Central Hawkes Bay. This is what started her conservation and environmental interests. She went on to study at Te Wānanga o Raukawa doing the Poutuarongo Kaitiakitanga Pūtaiao, a Bachelor in Environmental Management where she graduated in 2017 with a degree. Jo went and completed a diploma in Te Reo Māori as she always wanted to stand up and do her pepeha confidently at Hui but had not learnt like some of her other siblings who are fluent, she went on to lecture a basic Te Reo Māori course at the Learning Centre and loved passing on her knowledge and love for Te Reo Māori and all that comes with it. Jo loves being at the Learning Centre and giving back to the whānau within her community and also loves her roles within Rangitāne o Tamaki Nui a Rua Incorporated.

Whānau Ora Day

Every year the first Saturday of March Rangitāne o Tamaki nui a Rua Incorporated organise and runs a Whānau Ora day.

This year it was held at the A & P Showgrounds which had just over 800 whānau come through and enjoy all the free activities, entertainment and kai on the day.
Gloria Hauiti who is the Kāinga Whānau Ora Program Co-ordinator for Rangitāne o Tamaki Nui a Rua is the main organiser of the event.

Jo Heperi who is of Ngāti Hāmua descent is the current RMA officer for Rangitāne o Tamaki Nui a Rua. She has recently also taken on the kaimahi role in representation of Rangitāne o Tamaki nui a Rua for the Te Ahu a Tūranga roading project.

Jo has a had a great educational journey which is worth mentioning.
For half of her life Jo worked in the shearing sheds which she loved and because it was seasonal she decided to purchase a computer to study and broaden her educational knowledge.

She came across an advertisement in the local newspaper and discovered that there was an EIT regional Learning Centre in Waipukurau offering a Level 2 computer program which worked out great as she lives just down the road in Takapau.
She loved the course and had a feeling it would open up more educational opportunities for herself and she was right as she went on to do a level 3 qualification and a diploma in Business.

In 2007 she was offered a job at that learning centre to become a learning facilitator and a few months later as an assistant for students with disabilities.
She went on to get a diploma in therapeutic massage at the Lotus Holistic Centre in
Hastings which saw her open her own massage business and also teach an introductory massage course at EIT.

She joined the Taiwhenua o Tamatea in a project monitoring the water of the rivers in the Central Hawkes Bay. This is what started her conservation and environmental interests. She went on to study at Te Wānanga o Raukawa doing the Poutuarongo Kaitiakitanga Pūtaiao, a Bachelor in Environmental Management where she graduated in 2017 with a degree.
Jo went and completed a diploma in Te Reo Māori as she always wanted to stand up and do her pepeha confidently at Hui but had not learnt like some of her other siblings who are fluent, she went on to lecture a basic Te Reo Māori course at the Learning Centre and loved passing on her knowledge and love for Te Reo Māori and all that comes with it.
Jo loves being at the Learning Centre and giving back to the whānau within her community and also loves her roles within Rangitāne o Tamaki Nui a Rua Incorporated.

Ruahine

Last year we had a profile of a talented artist Cherry Peeti-Taparau.
In the pānui we highlighted her Tiki 2 Gallery and mentioned her admiration for our maunga Ruahine.

Since then Cherry along with whānau and friends have been trekking Ruahine and admiring her beauty.

A hut that she stayed in on the Ruahine previously known as the A Frame Hut was in dire need of some aroha. So Cherry approached DOC last year and asked if she could take over the care and maintenance of the hut. They agreed and Cherry and her father Lui Peeti had to sign a community agreement to become the caretakers of the hut.
Since then they have applied for funding to fix it as it needed quite a lot of mahi done to it, this included a new iron roof, replacement of rotting boards a total re-paint, re installation of a fire, toilet and water tank and the replacement of all the broken windows and steps.

This included the replacement of the Fascia Boards which Cherry put a contemporary  koru design on.
The design pays homage to our tūpuna Ruahine, and acknowledges our people
who came before us, our people who are here now, the epic beauty of the sunrise and lastly the name she has chosen for the hut Te Ao Tupare.

The reason for the name Te Ao Tupare is after some research on the area, Cherry discovered that Ruahine is covered in leatherwood trees these are called Olearia Colensoi and Tupare. It was found the space around the hut has the longest unbroken line of Tupare in the country and the most resilient.

This is why Cherry felt Te Ao Tupare was the most appropriate name for the hut. The hut is nearly completed and it has been such a rewarding process for her along with those who have helped and supported her through this project.

Cherry is always willing to take anyone who is interested to trek up the Ruahine for the first time. She has been a great ambassador  for the community of Tamaki Nui a Rua and thrives on  giving back to our people through her passion of art and her love for the environment.

You can follow her journey on her Facebook pages, ‘Just walk it Tiki2’, and, ‘Tiki 2 Gallery’.